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davidturk

Capturing images without a computer to control the camera

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Marlin had showed us a set-up where there was no computer to control the camera. I forgot to ask how they triggered the camera. Our Nikon D800 has no cable release (In fact I haven't seen a cable release on a camera for years). How do you operate the camera without touching it> Thanks for any info.

 

david

 

***PS-(marlin here, I'm inserting the image that David is talking about).

post-79-0-25021400-1349116446_thumb.jpg

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hi David!

 

In the image that I showed the class, the participants were triggering the camera through a cable release (that was taped to the floor to account for unneeded movement).

 

Your issue, trying to trigger a D800 with a cable release ... I'm not sure how to do that if the camera itself has no cable release port. (?!).

 

DLSR Remote Camera Remote.

you should check this out. Yosi at LACMA has used this in the past with great success. He attached his iphone to his arm with one of those sports bands and could fire his camera wirelessly. It requires that you setup a network: camera - laptop - device. Maybe this product would help you? If you use it *please report back with your professional opinion. I'm genuinely curious to know how the latest version(s) of this app work out for RTI capture.

 

OnOneSoftware

http://www.ononesoft...-camera-remote/

Be sure to check your camera compatibility — it does support the D800!

 

Canon - with a 'cable' port and Pocket Wizard Plus. FYI.

In the past we have triggered a canon camera with the old pocket wizard plus systems. I attached a pocket wizard to the camera hot port and used a "PC to cable release port" cable (forget exact term). The hand held pocket wizard fired the system when the 'test' button was pushed ... but we were still utilizing the cable release 'port'.

 

Perhaps there are others out there that might be able to add to this thread, anyone?

 

thanks David.

Marlin.

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The Canon cameras still all have a cable release port. A quick search on B&H shows cable release products for Nikon cameras, using a "10 pin" port. It seems that the D800 is not a listed camera that is supported by these products, but many recent Nikon models are supported.

 

Nikon and Canon both make a small, inexpensive infrared wireless remote trigger. (Nikon's is called an ML-L3)I haven't tried that, but it seems like it would work. And as Marlin states there are various ways to trigger a camera remotely if the camera is tethered to a computer, but you don't want to push a button on the computer to do the triggering. One advantage of running tethered is that the files can be named and downloaded and managed. If you use a cable release or wireless remote, then you are shooting to the card, and you have to manage your test shots separate from your actual set of images, etc. Doable, just one more thing to pay attention to.

 

Carla

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Thanks guys. Our new laptop for RTI is coming, but I wanted to try some tests while I'm waiting. There's no computer in our studio anymore, so I was looking for some way to trigger the camera. I'll just have to be patient & wait for the new laptop--we've got everything else in place, ready to go.

 

david

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One the Topic is Triggers, Cable Releases and wired / wireless triggering devices ...

 

I found this product:

 

The ioShutter Camera Remote

http://photojojo.com/store/awesomeness/ioshutter-camera-remote/

 

(david - i *don't see the D800 supported with this product, but .... FYI in any case).

 

The most Notable RTI related feature in the product is a "Sound Activated Trigger Release!"

 

Take note — we at CHI have not used this product — but we would love to get some feedback from this community — should you make the decision to purchase and test this product!

 

-Marlin.

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We routinely use a remote shutter release for our RTI captures (we almost never use a laptop in the field). In the case of Nikon shooting I would suggest against either ML-3 or ML-L3 (yes they are TWO Nikon remote shutter releases). The latter, the ML-3 will work with "pro" bodies like the D700, D300s and D800, while the ML-3 will work with the built in IR sensor of bodies like the D7000 or D5100. The ML-3 is very expensive ($250) and not worth it. In any case, both use an IR trigger that is not suitable for RTI because the remote must be pointed directly at the infrared receiver. The range of even the ML-3 is only about 1-2m.

 

The remote I currently recommend for Nikon is the Phottix Cleon II: http://www.phottix.com/en/wireless-remotes/phottixr-cleon-ii.html

 

The Phottix is Radio Frequency, not IR, and so does not need a direct line of sight between the remote and the receiver. It's also a lot cheaper than a Pocket Wizard (incidentally, we have not had good experiences with the Nikon version of the Pocket Wizard).

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While not necessarily better or cheaper, I'll offer the following alternative solution I came up with since my Panasonic GH2 micro four-thirds format camera wasn't listed as compatible with Pocket Wizard remotes. I've been using Trigmaster wireless remote triggers made by Aputure [that's how they spell it] for my GH2. They also make Trigmaster remotes that are compatible with Nikon and Canon. They seem to work fine with my camera and a Canon 580EX speedlight. They run on 2.4 GHz and have 6 to 16 channels. The Trigmaster units have a separate transmitter and receivers, while the Trigmaster Plus unit can be used as either a receiver or transceiver. They weren't too expensive (I paid about $57 for a Trigmaster package including a trigger with two receivers, and $34 for a single Trigmaster Plus transceiver).

 

I use the Trigmaster transmitter for my remote shutter release button, put the Trigmaster Plus transceiver on the camera's hotshoe with a cable connected to the shutter release/mic port, and a Trigmaster receiver on the flash hotshoe (580EX on a separate handle). For simplicity, an alternative setup can be arranged using only Trigmaster Plus transceivers, but costs a little more. Getting the various switches into the right positions required some trial and error, but they work. On the downside, the Trigmaster transmitter requires a small, unique 23A, 12V battery (supposedly good for 20,000 clicks), while the other units use standard AAA batteries, so there are more batteries to keep track of. They don't appear to be very rugged for outdoor use in variable weather (I haven't tried them outside), but I've had no problems using them indoors so far.

 

Also, Paul C. Buff, Inc. (http://paulcbuff.com/cybersync.php) makes wireless remotes for his flash systems that may work for others (h/t to Marlin).

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I'll add another thought for the Nikon shooters...the Solmeta Geotaggers can also functino as radio frequency shutter releases: http://www.solmeta.com/Product/show/id/14

 

We just got the N2 Pro for our field work. It's really nice to have high accuracy GPS (~2m), a heading information (it has a triple axis compass) as well as a full GPS logging unit that replaces the hand-held. That we can also use it to release the trigger for RTI is icing on the cake.

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We have been successfully using a Nikon D90 with a Vello RS-N211 shutter release cable. If you do go this route, be sure to keep your receipt and original packaging. Our first one stopped working after about 10 months. It was still under warranty, so we returned it for a new one. We also ended up purchasing a second one for back-up since they are inexpensive. 

 

Vello RS-N211 shutter release cable:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/765672-REG/Vello_RS_N2II_RS_N2_Wired_Remote_Switch.html

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The new Canon cameras have built in wireless and free ios apps (and likely android too)  We finally got around to playing with this on our Canon 6D, and it is great!  You set up the wireless on the camera, and then the app conects with it and you can use live view, change settings, and fire the camera. There is even a way to put the camera in manual focus in software - so you don't have to change the switch on the lens.  Several Canon models have this capability now.  The only downside is that it is a battery burner.  So, make sure you have an AC adapter if you are int he studio, or a couple of spares if in the field.

 

Carla

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