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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/13/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Yours for the low, low price of $24,000 (not including camera). Or you can build your own for less than 5% of the cost: https://hackaday.io/project/11951-affordable-reflectance-transformation-imaging-dome
  2. 1 point
    There are a lot of 32bit apps stil in use out there. Here's a quote from an article in Time magazine this week about how to check to see what 32bit apps you have on your system: "... if you’re dependent on a particular 32-bit app, it won’t work in macOS Catalina, as many Twitter users discovered after upgrading. Meanwhile, some popular apps, like Adobe Photoshop, appear to be suffering from temporary compatibility issues with Catalina, so it’s best to hold off on upgrading until a software patch resolves those problems. Want to see which of your apps are still 32-bit? On your Mac, hit the Apple menu, select About This Mac, and click System Report. In System Report, scroll down to Legacy Software, and take a look at all your 32-bit apps." Here's the full article: https://time.com/5696302/macos-catalina-upgrade/ I know this doesn't resolve the problem if RTI software no longer running - but I did want to point out that folks might want to be cautious about upgrading until they see the full impact - not just RTI software. Carla
  3. 1 point
    Thank you for letting us know about this. We can contact various folks to see what the simplest fix is for this issue. For the PTMFitter - that is HP software, and not open source. We do not have the source code for it - but I know some researchers who have it. Carla
  4. 1 point
    We run RTIBuilder successfully on a Windows 10 machine. We are mostly a Mac shop, so I'm not super familiar with the Windows environment, but I wanted to note that Windows 10 can successfully run RTIBuilder. The software is old, and we'd love to update it. We are a small independent nonprofit, and the initial work was paid for by a grant and some volunteer efforts. We'd love to get funding to update it, but selling individual copies isn't a way to get that done (especially since it is open source software, per the agreements of the funder and all parties involved in it's development). We still use RTI frequently, and think it is a very useful technique. It will take a new grant to create an updated version. Thanks to Dave for jumping in and asking for the details. Much appreciated! Carla
  5. 1 point
    Christine, Can you post a screenshot of the error message please? (if there are multiple error messages, a screen shot of each message please). Also, can you look at the Windows event logs and post any messages there that relate to when you try to start RTI builder please. Dave
  6. 1 point
    Never could get the dropbox download to work but there is an upload that worked for me here! At the end of the thread
  7. 1 point
    This is a good development. Thanks for this as it will help move cultural heritage imaging in Nigeria to the next level.
  8. 1 point
    Thank you very for this wonderful initiative we hope this will encourage us to develop our technology based on our heritages
  9. 1 point
    Thanks for this great initiative and opportunity. Such a welcomed development
  10. 1 point
    Thank you Dave, this information is extremely helpful.
  11. 1 point
  12. 1 point
    I think there was an error in the above recommendations - you absolutely need to align the images with the scale bars in order to use them to set scale for your project. How you placed the scale bars will affect exactly how you work with those images. The Agisoft software will not be confused by some images that have scale bars and some that don't for the same area of your scene - as long as you have good crisp photos with good overlap between photos and plenty of look angles. It's a bit difficult to describe in text, but hopefully this makes sense. Carla
  13. 1 point
    We recently found out about this. I've set up a dropbox folder with both the Windows and Mac versions of the PTMFitter, along with the license from HP: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/jfsy0lhxu6zv4i4/AADJpq6E_GJmNw_s5C8r94CVa?dl=0 Carla
  14. 1 point
    Cultural Heritage Imaging (CHI) offers some free resources to people adopting the practice of photogrammetry. In addition, our experts are available for paid consulting and/or training. Here are some resources not to be missed. 1. Videos describing key principles of good photogrammetric capture: https://vimeo.com/channels/practicalphotogrammetry See also our Photogrammetry technology overview: http://culturalheritageimaging.org/Technologies/Photogrammetry/ 2. This, our free user forum, where folks in the community help answer questions about RTI and photogrammetry. We aim to complement the resources offered by Agisoft PhotoScan and other software packages, as they have their own communities. However, discussions about equipment, capture tips, and so on are welcome here: http://forums.culturalheritageimaging.org/ 3. We sell calibrated scale bars that help users get precise, real-world measurement into your product. And we offer a "tips and tricks" free guide for working with scale bars on the Photoscan website (find the link on this page): http://culturalheritageimaging.org/What_We_Offer/Gear/Scale_Bars/index.html 4. We offer regular 4-day training classes in photogrammetry in our studio in San Francisco and in other locations. Sometimes a host institution will offer space and will purchase some seats and allow some seats to be sold. You can learn more about our photogrammetry training here: http://culturalheritageimaging.org/What_We_Offer/Training/photogram_training/index.html 5. And finally, we offer custom consulting to help folks adopt and use photogrammetry and RTI. That can take a variety of forms, including video, emails, and projects in Dropbox where we can review work and give feedback. Learn more about our consulting offering here: http://culturalheritageimaging.org/What_We_Offer/Consulting/
  15. 1 point
    We are focusing on good practice for collecting image sets for photogrammetry - which is independent of the software used. We feel that if people collect good image sets that follow the rules (as described in our videos) then they have useful information for now and the future contained in those image sets. Especially if they collect some metadata about what they are doing, their methodology, who was involved, the subjects and locations, etc. We are developing tools for that called the Digital Lab Notebook. While we do use Metashape (aka Photoscan) at this time, the methodology is not dependent on the software. So our freely available public information is not about Metashape. We agree that the Metashape community forums are a great place to go for information about working with that software. We do use an error reduction workflow in Metashape that is a bit different than the process most folks follow. We teach that in our training classes. We spend time looking at metrics and what they mean, and also trying to impart an understanding of the sfm photogrammetry approach, and how that informs the guidance we give on collecting image sets. Our goal is to impart knowledge rather than give a "cookbook" approach, so folks can deal with a variety of situations in their own work, and make the appropriate trade-offs to meet their needs. This kind of material doesn't fit into a forum post. Carla
  16. 1 point
    Shahin, I think the answer is "it depends"! - it depends on what you're trying to image - a small artefact or a building; it depends on what version of PhotoScan you're using (and just to confuse things, they have renamed it from PhotoScan to Metashape with the release of version 1.5); it depends on the sensor used; etc. Far and away the best place to search for help on PhotoScan is on the dedicated Agisoft forum - just search for "workflow" (almost 80 hits). One thread to which I would particularly refer you to is https://www.agisoft.com/forum/index.php?topic=9485.msg43931#msg43931 which discusses the workflow developed by Tom Noble et al of the USGS, and that of Bob Meij. (would also suggest this might be better in a thread of its own ....) Dave
  17. 1 point
    The old ptmfitter had an effective image size limit of 24 megapixels on Windows, even on systems with lots of RAM. The new ptmfitter from Kirk Martinez' group has no problems handling images up to 100 megapixels in size; I don't go any higher because the RTIViewer software has problems above 100 megapixels. https://custom-imaging.co.uk/software/
  18. 1 point
    Failure to align 2 sections together if you have masked the images is usually due to a lack of overlapping detail between the two sets of images. For very small objects, differences in focus can also be problematic, especially on turntables and an object with a high length:width ratio. When planning a shoot I pick where the join between the 2 sections will be on the object and then position it so that I can ensure that images in both sets provide adequate coverage across this area. In the case of complex objects you may find that 2 orientations is not enough and you may need to shoot 3 or 4. To ensure focus overlap as well I either shoot focus stacking (rarely) or shoot handheld and move around the object so that I can carefully position the plane of focus.
  19. 1 point
    Hmmmm... https://broncolor.swiss/scope/ https://truvis.ch/ For a brand-new breakthrough visualization technology, it looks awfully familiar ...
  20. 1 point
    We at CHI are thrilled to announce the release of the first two tools (Version 1 Beta) in a new software suite, the Digital Lab Notebook (DLN). DLN is a metadata toolkit designed to simplify the collection of standards-based metadata, essential to scientific imaging. The goal is widespread democratization of tools that worldwide cultural caretakers can deploy to digitally capture, build, archive, and reuse digital representations. We hope you will download and try out these new tools! DLN:CaptureContext With a user-friendly interface, this tool expedites and simplifies user input of metadata -- such as locations, institutions, imaging subjects, image rights -- with a template process. DLN:Inspector This tool automatically ensures that each image set meets the requirements for high-quality computational photography imaging, checking for image-processing errors, such as sharpening, that should not be applied to photogrammetry or RTI image data. Instructional Videos for DLN See our new Vimeo channel -- Simplifying Scientific Imaging -- where we have posted an instructional video series about the DLN, what it does, how to use the software tools, and more.
  21. 1 point
    I've been exploring the use of an open-source image processing program developed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) called ImageJ, and a related plug-in called DStretch. While RTI is very effective for examining texture, ImageJ and DStretch provide tools for analyzing color information, in addition to other capabilities, which can complement the use of RTI. (Image J and DStretch are Java-based programs, and you should check that you have installed the latest Java security update.) Both programs can be found easily by a simple search, or you can use the following links: ImageJ: http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/index.html DStretch: http://www.dstretch.com/ DStretch is short for "decorrelation stretch," an image enhancement technique originally developed at JPL for remote sensing applications. It has been successfully applied at rock art sites for identifying pictographs, where the composition consists primarily of pigments, as distinct from petroglyphs, which are defined by texture (apologies to archeologists for my loose definitions). An advantage of these tools over a proprietary program such as Photoshop is that they allow users to modify color-spaces in very specific, controlled ways, using defined algorithms. The Dstretch algorithm allows one to "reset" the image back to its original color values, so you can "undo" the effects of any filter you apply using the software. A more detailed explanation of the algorithms in DStretch is provided here: http://www.dstretch.com/AlgorithmDescription.html The approach I'm using to integrate DStretch into RTI workflows is to process the RTIs first (creating a .ptm or .rti file), then use the RTIViewer to relight the image and apply PTM/RTI algorithms to bring out textural details. When I'm happy with the RTI image, I save a snapshot from the viewer. The snapshot can then be opened in ImageJ, and the DStretch algorithms can be applied to enhance color features. A limitation of this approach is that it's generally best to leave the colors unchanged when saving the image in the RTI Viewer. This can be done either by using the "default" setting or, if using Diffuse Gain or Specular Enhancement, by setting the "gain" or "Kd" controls at the positions that leave the most color in the image. This constrains the application of algorithmic enhancements in the RTIViewer somewhat, but it allows both textural and color features to be rendered in ways that are complementary. Another approach, which might be preferable from a scientific perspective, is to process the images for color and texture using ImageJ/DStretch and RTI separately, and compare or combine the images using fade features available in other software. Keeping a log of how the images are processed would be very important, in any case. (Thanks to CHI Forums member Dr. George Bevan for pointing me to ImageJ and to Dr. Jon Harman for the DStretch plug-in.)
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